Alan’s Monday Morning Memo – 2/22/10

Alan's Monday Morning Memo

Alan’s Monday Morning Memo’s mission is to help readers to thrive. February 22, 2010—Issue #23 This week’s focus point: The mighty can fall with alarming suddenness. Toyota and Tiger Woods are merely two recent examples of organizational and professional calamity. The more successful you are, the higher standards customers expect. We can afford errors in honest execution much more than detriment to our reputations caused by dishonest motives. Ask yourself the classic question when faced with challenging decisions: Would I …


Homeward

I was at the desk of The Stafford this morning checking out, when a man walked up next to me and told the desk clerk that he was departing and she could just leave the charges on his bill. She asked that he wait a minute to check his totals, while I was checking mine. I looked up to find Matt LeBlanc, of “Friends” and “Joey” fame, looking at me. We said hello, compared experiences on this being both of …


Odds and Ends Again

• A speaker sends out a promotional piece stating “over 1 million audience members over 17 years.” What are we expected to believe with all this stuff? (Do the math.) • When I respond to nuisance spam from some guy I never heard of, he replies that “we’re connected on linkedin,” and he’s very familiar with my work. Then why is he sending me a blanket, hyped-up offering to “improve my marketing skills”? Some Internet “marketing coach” probably told him …


Shameless Promotion

I’ve just conducted a follow-up here in London for some of my Shameless Promotion Workshop grads, and here is a consensus list of what they’ve been doing to successfully increase their visibility and dramatically gain business: • Improved web sites, as credibility statements, to state-of-the-art • Created book proposals, sought and obtained agents and book contracts • Obtained board positions with trade associations and non-profits • Issued monthly or more frequent press releases • Begun teleconference series • Contacted trade association executive directors for speaking engagements …


London Redux II

We’ve been to Les Trois Garcons, Greens, and tonight, Scott’s, one of the finest restaurants I’ve even been in. Spectacular service (the bartender allowed me tastings of two vodkas) and fish so good that it made me weep. Octopus carpaccio, smoked haddock, and for dessert, anchovies on toast! Six of us enjoying a rare meal with one of the finest Montrechets around, a Batard 2003. Martinis and two bottles later, we headed for The Strand. We couldn’t get into the …


London Redux

Arrived smack on time on Virgin Air. Security in Boston took all of 60 seconds, and immigration and customs at Heathrow took 90 seconds. Virgin gives you an express pass which is even faster, apparently, then having an EU passport. We had to find our driver amidst 50 or so holding signs (one doing so with his teeth, thank goodness not our driver), and The Stafford had our penthouse suite ready for our 8 am arrival. We visited Harrod’s, enjoyed …


Off to London

Our driver picked us up at 3:30 and took us to Boston, where we’re ensconced in the Virgin Airlines upper class club, awaiting our flight to London. The club has been completely redone, no longer shared with Northwest, features a Charcuterie (I’m chomping on antipasto and stuffed grape leaves) of amazing variety, and a uniformed hostess takes your coat and bags and gives you a quick tour of the place. (The Virgin club at Heathrow, which we’ll hit on the …



Seth Kahan Interviews Alan Weiss

This is a podcast you absolutely have to listen to. Seth Kahan, author of Freelance Fortune, interviews Dr. Alan Weiss as they discuss Alan’s mentor program and mentor mastery program. In this interview Alan talks about: * How he grew the Mentor Program from its inception in 1996 * Dramatic successes among participants * Buddy and Koufax, his personal helpers * His unique style of mentoring * His decision to expand the Mentor Program by inviting exceptional participants to become …


Consulting Lessons

Let’s take a look at recent events and see what they teach us as consultants. 1. Toyota Ultimately, leadership relies on judgment. Judgment should always be in the customers’ favor. The first reaction to adverse feedback or conditions can’t be to adjourn to the bunker or begin to “spin” the facts. You can’t blame floor mats and driver incompetence for engineering errors that represent a frightening expense to correct, because sooner or later the truth “outs.” Get off the floor …