You Get What You Pay For

I think that people believe, for better or worse, they get what they pay for. They’ll excuse something cheap that breaks (“It only cost a few bucks”) even though it was clearly meant to last far longer. And they’ll cheer at mediocrity because if they paid a lot for it, well, darn it, we’re going to extol it. That explains the exasperating standing ovations for arrant mediocrity, from regional theater to Broadway. I can understand a school production where everyone …


Language to Use When the Buyer Asks About Fees

Language to Use When the Buyer Asks About Fees • I have no idea, but I can give you some options and ranges as soon as tomorrow if I can ask you a few questions now. • It would be unfair to you for me to cite any fee without understanding your needs and the scope of your expectations. I want to consider what I can do to most effectively minimize your investment while maximizing your return on it. • Let’s …






Alan’s Monday Morning Memo – 03/28/11

Alan's Monday Morning Memo

March 28, 2011—Issue #80 This week’s focus point: In a workshop, I once asked participants what they would do with an extra million dollars of income. Many people had a hard time deciding about this. A “million” had become an empty metaphor, a superficial goal. TIAABB: There Is Always A Bigger Boat. Think about the outcomes you want to accomplish: family support, education, retirement, travel, philanthropy, and so on. Don’t worry about the input side: X clients, Y sales, Z …



Eight Things To Do When You Enter A Buyer’s Office and Before You Leave It

When you enter a buyer’s office for the first time, here are some useful behaviors to discipline yourself to follow. They’ll help you understand the person, the environment, and your own actions, as well as calm you down if needed. 1. Look around. What is the office like? Large or small? Is there comfortable seating or merely a desk and chairs? Are there mementoes, photos, and awards, or is the place institutional and sterile? Is it neat or does it …