Monthly Archives: March 2012

Success Practices from the Hall of Fame

From the Mentor Hall of Fame meeting at The Palace Hotel in New York City:

Success Practices

• Tell the client what others have been afraid to tell.

• Connect one-on-one, never email when you can phone, never phone when you can visit in person.

• Raise new ideas and don’t wait to “perfect” them.

• Provide options: “There are four options for us to examine….”

• Be frank and self-disclosing about your passion for the work.

• Create meetings by alerting the client that you’ll “be in the neighborhood” on certain dates.

• Focus on the buyer’s personal objectives in addition to the business objectives.

• Recycle and repurpose your intellectual property in different media at different times.

• Always pursue clients in the fourth quarter of their fiscal years when there are often funds that must be spent prior to year-end.

• Never worry about “too many leads” or “too much business.” Devise ways to stagger and coordinate business; streamline your model; delegate work to the client; and/or use subcontractors.

• Pursue success not perfection.

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Consulting Philosophy | 2 Comments

The Adventures of Koufax and Buddy Beagle

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in The Friday Funnies | 1 Comment

Quick Tips to Success from the Hall of Fame Members

From our current Private Roster Mentor Community Hall of Fame® Meeting in New York City:

• Embrace your entire life, don’t “compartmentalize” your business.

• Simple is far more valuable than complex.

• Market even more when you are successful and have the funds to invest.

• You are far better served developing additional business in existing clients than trying to continually acquire new clients.

• A good idea isn’t enough—you have to monetize it through some kind of product or service offering.

• To grow substantially you can’t merely do “more of the same.” You have to think differently, and you may need help to do that.

• Mere interest is insufficient. Passion is required, in business and life.

• Always prepare a “Plan B” (e.g., to replay a key client or employee).

• Only an open mind can accept new ideas.

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Consulting Philosophy | Leave a comment

Alan’s Monday Morning Memo – 3/26/12

March 26, 2012—Issue #131

This week’s focus point: Organizations which are in terrible shape have usually been victimized by a series of poor decisions by management. There is no reason to believe that they will suddenly see the error of their ways, hire you, and adhere closely to your advice. Instead, they will be protective, defensive, and miserly. But organizations in great shape have leaders who make intelligent choices, are willing to listen to new ideas, and have money to invest. Which would you think are higher potential for your business? Don’t be fooled by the decades-old advice to find or create “pain.” Instead, find strong people for whom you can create growth, innovation, and excitement. They are your top prospects.

Monday Morning Perspective: Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there. — Will Rogers

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking HERE.

Privacy statement: Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.

Contact information: info@summitconsulting.com
http://www.contrarianconsulting.com
ISSN 2151-0091

© Alan Weiss 2011. All rights reserved

I remember a meeting with a boutique consulting firm that had fallen on hard times. The debate was whether or not to sell their magnificent conference table. “Where would clients sit?” asked one partner. “We have no clients,” stated the advocate of selling. You can’t cut your way to renewal or success. Top line growth is the key to bottom line achievement, for you and for your clients. Today is the time to invest in the future. Once you cut muscle, you’re powerless.
Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Alan's Monday Morning Memo | Leave a comment

Criminal!

Are we increasingly treated as criminals until proven innocent?  Listen and find out!

Download MP3

and now also on iTunes

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Podcast Series: The Way I See It | 1 Comment

The Adventures of Koufax and Buddy Beagle

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in The Friday Funnies | Leave a comment

Episode 67: Election Blues

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in The Movies: The Writing on the Wall | Leave a comment

Don’t Worry About Your Concern

Folks, I’ve been through the real lows and the absolute highs in this profession, and I’m thankful the latter have been more abundant and permanent. But I know the roller coaster ride, and here’s a piece of advice, not just for consultants, but anyone: There is a difference between worry and concern.

Concern is the proper mindset for caring about an important issue, event, or condition. It means we apply ourselves to create effective resolution, monitor it, and utilize proper priorities.

Worry is the inappropriate reaction which dampens our talents, creates often irrational behavior, and moves in circles which, like a corkscrew, drills deeper and deeper while going nowhere but down.

We spend too much time worrying, which is emotional loneliness and captivity, rather than exercising proper actions because we’re concerned. When we’re concerned, we wade in and resolve issues, we don’t sit on the sidelines fretting about them. (To fret. A great infinitive verb.) Worry is draining and enervating. Concern is positive and energizing.

Being worried doesn’t accomplish a thing other than create great stress. Being concerned creates intelligent actions and resolutions.

So don’t worry about being concerned. But be concerned about worrying.

© Alan Weiss 2012. All rights reserved.

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Personal Improvement | 5 Comments

Alan’s Monday Morning Memo – 3/19/12

March 19, 2012—Issue #130

This week’s focus point: The busiest restaurants I go to appeal to all ages. The iPad is so popular because both kids and their grandparents can use it easily and to great advantage. You see every kind of demographic at baseball, football, and basketball games. Blockbuster films, from “The Godfather” to “Titanic,” have universal appeal. Broaden your own appeal, to all kinds of customers and clients. Don’t focus on ridiculous generational labels, be they “X,” “Y,” “Boomer,” or “Greatest Generation.” First and foremost, we are all people and can be attracted through practical value and obvious improvement. Just watch all those varied people at the ballpark eating the same hot dogs while they follow scores on an app on their iPhones.

Monday Morning Perspective: It is much easier to recognize error than to find truth; the former lies on the surface, this is quite manageable. The latter resides in depth, and this quest is not everyone’s business. — Goethe

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking HERE.

Privacy statement: Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.

Contact information: info@summitconsulting.com
http://www.contrarianconsulting.com
ISSN 2151-0091

© Alan Weiss 2011. All rights reserved

I remember a meeting with a boutique consulting firm that had fallen on hard times. The debate was whether or not to sell their magnificent conference table. “Where would clients sit?” asked one partner. “We have no clients,” stated the advocate of selling. You can’t cut your way to renewal or success. Top line growth is the key to bottom line achievement, for you and for your clients. Today is the time to invest in the future. Once you cut muscle, you’re powerless.
Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Alan's Monday Morning Memo | Leave a comment

NORK (No One Really Knows)

A long time ago, the great science fiction writer, Robert Heinlein, created the neologism “grok” in the magnificent novel, Stranger in A Strange Land. It means to “grasp” and truly understand, sort of.

I’m introducing NORK, which means that “no one really knows.” No one really knows when and why the markets go up and down. NORK why some actors, athletes, business people make it, and others don’t. Certainly NORK when some buyers are ready to buy so a consultant can arrive at the precise right time and place.

We need to trust our own judgment, experience, and analysis before relying on those of others, because NORK, so we might as well believe in ourselves. You will be told that your book can’t possibly succeed, that you won’t enjoy the Caribbean, that you need to have a certification to be taken seriously, and that Apple stock was a bad purchase all those years ago. But NORK. If I’m going to fail, I’ll do it on my own terms, not because of NORK advice, and if I’m going to succeed it will be on my own merits.

We can’t predict the arrival and paths of tornadoes, or earthquakes, or the direction of investments, or the winner of sports championships—at least, not with any reliable degree of accuracy. Why listen to others, unless they’ve been there and done it well and can provide pragmatic skills that work for you right now?

If I had listened to the “experts,” I would never have gone into solo practice, invested the money I did in the manner I did, created my value-based fee approach, piloted the Goodyear Blimp, or written 45 books. But I didn’t and I did.

You know why? Because conventional wisdom is neither conventional nor wisdom. It’s a copout. It’s a product of NORK. And I’m not.

I grok NORK.

© Alan Weiss 2012. All rights reserved.

Print This Post Print This Post
Posted in Consulting Philosophy, Personal Improvement | 4 Comments