Second Law of Thermodynamics

There is no such thing in this—or most other—professions as a “plateau.” The Second Law of Thermodynamics states, briefly, that in any closed system (wherein no outside energy enters the system) entropy will result. A decline takes place as existing energy is exhausted. Don’t kid yourself. If you’re not growing (creating more energy) then you’re declining. Not much of a choice, is it? © Alan Weiss 2016



What’s the Temperature?

I may have far less depth than you, but what happens to me sometimes is this: I get in the car and the outside temperature reading is 63° and I’m thinking, “Wow, great day for December!” Then I realize that I’m sitting in the car in the garage. Once I open the door and drive away the temperature reverts to an accurate 37°. A great many times we make assumptions based on where we are and not where we intend …



A Good Cigar

I had a gift certificate to one of my cigar clubs, and I know they carry the “cigar of the year.” (La Flor Dominicana Andalusian Bull) I walked in mid-day, when I’m never otherwise there, and I encountered the bar/cigar tender who’s on that shift, a very attractive woman I had never met. I told her what I needed and we entered the vast humidor. We found the cigars, and when I tried to leave, the door was locked. “Uh, …




The Non-Resolutions

Statistically, 94.56% of New Year’s resolutions are not met. (I made that up, but I’d bet on it.) The error is in making them in the first place without support. Want to accomplish some great objective—write a book, lose 25 pounds, close six-figure projects, learn to play the guitar? Then, counterintuitively, focus on the tasks and write them in your calendar as non-violable “appointments with yourself” beginning January 1. Examples: Hire a music teacher, stop eating starches, write a book …


Alan Weiss’s Monday Morning Memo® – 12/26/16

Alan's Monday Morning Memo

I forgot who said this (I’ve seen an early reference in the Gospel of Matthew), but I never forgot it: An act of charity is not defined by how much you give, but by how much you have left after you give. When we were poor, I remember my father slipping $10 into someone’s mailbox (a huge amount) whom he knew was in even worse shape. That to me was far more impressive than someone of means giving $10,000 or …